Photo essay: Lion’s Head from Table Mountain

Photo essay: Lion’s Head from Table Mountain

When you’re at the top of Table Mountain, there are many incredible sights to take in. We’ve shown you Cape Town Stadium, now take a look at photographs of the amazing view of Lion’s Head from our summit.

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Lion’s Head, seen here immediately to the right of Table Mountain, is immensely popular with locals and the parking area is always packed on good-weather days, when eager types take on the steep slopes. The hike can take up to an hour and a half, and time is indirectly proportional to your fitness levels. Photo courtesy M. C. Lachlan.

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Lion’s Head’s uppermost point is at 669m above sea level – much lower than Table Mountain’s 1 067m. It’s a favourite spot for paragliding too, and gliders launch off its slopes. Photo courtesy vlad323.

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Lion’s Head is part of Table Mountain National Park and is covered in natural fynbos vegetation. It is also of great historical significance for the Cape Malay community, and there are a number of graves and shrines of Malay leaders on the slopes. Photo courtesy coda.

The upper “bald spot” of Lion’s Head consists of flat-lying Table Mountain sandstone. The lower slopes are formed by the Cape Granite and the Malmesbury Formation, which are older Precambrian rocks. Photo courtesy flowcomm.

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A hike up Lion’s Head is particularly popular during full moon, when groups of hikers ascend the peak armed with warm clothes, flashlights and refreshments. Don’t ever attempt the hike alone! While it is not particularly treacherous, accidents do happen and it can get very cold up there at night. Photo courtesy bloudraak.

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